70 176

Cited 0 times in

The association between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and carotid atherosclerosis in subjects with within-reference range alanine aminotransferase levels.

Authors
Kim, KS; Oh, HJ; Kim, DJ; Kim, SK; Park, SW; Cho, YW; Huh, KB
Citation
Endocrine journal, 60(12):1295-1301, 2013
Journal Title
Endocrine journal
ISSN
0918-89591348-4540
Abstract
Our aim was to investigate whether the evaluation of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by ultrasound provides additional benefit in assessing carotid atherosclerotic burden in subjects with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) concentrations within the reference range. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 769 healthy individuals (326 men and 443 women) with an ALT concentration ≤ 40 IU/L and alcohol consumption < 140 g/week. Mean carotid artery intima-media thickness (C-IMT) was measured using ultrasound. NAFLD was defined as a mild or greater degree of hepatic steatosis on ultrasound. Although all subjects had an ALT concentration within the reference range, the prevalence of NAFLD increased with increasing quartiles of ALT concentration (27.1%, 40.0%, 54.7%, 75.3% in men, P for trend < 0.001; 22.0%, 34.4%, 35.7%, 55.0% in women, P for trend < 0.001). In the 3(rd) and 4(th) quartiles of ALT concentration, women with NAFLD had a significantly higher C-IMT than those without NAFLD (0.671±0.019 mm vs. 0.742±0.025 mm, P=0.023 in Q3; 0.651±0.023 mm vs. 0.737±0.021 mm, P=0.005 in Q4). These differences remained significant even after adjusting for a broad spectrum of potential confounders. In contrast, although men with NAFLD tended to have a higher C-IMT than those without NAFLD in each quartile, these differences were not statistically significant. Women with an upper normal range ALT concentration showed increased C-IMT only when they had NAFLD. Therefore, in women with an elevated ALT level within the reference range, further evaluation for NAFLD, such as liver ultrasound, could potentially identify those patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease.
PMID
24047563
Appears in Collections:
Journal Papers > School of Medicine / Graduate School of Medicine > Endocrinology & Metabolism
AJOU Authors
김, 대중
Full Text Link
Files in This Item:
1295-1301.pdfDownload
Export
RIS (EndNote)
XLS (Excel)
XML

qrcode

해당 아이템을 이메일로 공유하기 원하시면 인증을 거치시기 바랍니다.

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse