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Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Receptor Dictates Beneficial Effects of Treadmill Training by Regulating Survival and Migration of Neural Stem Cell Grafts in the Injured Spinal Cord

Authors
Hwang, DH  | Park, HH | Shin, HY | Cui, Y | Kim, BG
Citation
Experimental neurobiology, 27(6). : 489-507, 2018
Journal Title
Experimental neurobiology
ISSN
1226-25602093-8144
Abstract
Survival and migration of transplanted neural stem cells (NSCs) are prerequisites for therapeutic benefits in spinal cord injury. We have shown that survival of NSC grafts declines after transplantation into the injured spinal cord, and that combining treadmill training (TMT) enhances NSC survival via insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Here, we aimed to obtain genetic evidence that IGF-1 signaling in the transplanted NSCs determines the beneficial effects of TMT. We transplanted NSCs heterozygous (+/-) for Igf1r, the gene encoding IGF-1 receptor, into the mouse spinal cord after injury, with or without combining TMT. We analyzed the influence of genotype and TMT on locomotor recovery and survival and migration of NSC grafts. In vitro experiments were performed to examine the potential roles of IGF-1 signaling in the migratory ability of NSCs. Mice receiving +/- NSC grafts showed impaired locomotor recovery compared with those receiving wild-type (+/+) NSCs. Locomotor improvement by TMT was more pronounced with +/+ grafts. Deficiency of one allele of Igf1r significantly reduced survival and migration of the transplanted NSCs. Although TMT did not significantly influence NSC survival, it substantially enhanced the extent of migration for only +/+ NSCs. Cultured neurospheres exhibited dynamic motility with cytoplasmic protrusions, which was regulated by IGF-1 signaling. IGF-1 signaling in transplanted NSCs may be essential in regulating their survival and migration. Furthermore, TMT may promote NSC graft-mediated locomotor recovery via activation of IGF-1 signaling in transplanted NSCs. Dynamic NSC motility via IGF-1 signaling may be the cellular basis for the TMT-induced enhancement of migration.
Keywords
DOI
10.5607/en.2018.27.6.489
PMID
30636901
Appears in Collections:
Journal Papers > School of Medicine / Graduate School of Medicine > Brain Science
Ajou Authors
김, 병곤  |  황, 동훈
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