32 352

Cited 0 times in

Comparison of 3 needle sizes for trigger point injection in myofascial pain syndrome of upper- and middle-trapezius muscle: a randomized controlled trial.

Authors
Yoon, SH; Rah, UW; Sheen, SS; Cho, KH
Citation
Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation, 90(8):1332-1339, 2009
Journal Title
Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation
ISSN
0003-99931532-821X
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate (1) the relation between needle diameter and treatment efficacy of myofascial pain syndrome and (2) the relation between needle diameter and pain intensity during injection.



DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial.



SETTING: University-affiliated tertiary-care hospital.



PARTICIPANTS: Volunteers (N=77) with myofascial pain syndrome affecting upper- and middle-trapezius muscles with at least 3 months' duration of pain.



INTERVENTION: Participants were randomly assigned to receive trigger point injections on 1 side of the trapezius with a 21-, 23-, or 25-gauge needle. After a 1-time injection, participants were followed up for 14 days. Participants and the assessor were blinded for group assignment.



MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Treatment efficacy was measured with the visual analog scale (VAS; at pretreatment, and posttreatment on days 1, 4, 7, 14) for neck and upper-back pain, the Neck Disability Index (NDI; at pretreatment, and posttreatment on days 7, 14), and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36, at pretreatment and posttreatment on days 7, 14) for health-related quality of life. Pain intensity during injection was evaluated immediately after injection with VAS.



RESULTS: VAS scores for posttreatment on days 4, 7, and 14 decreased significantly compared with pretreatment scores in all groups; NDI scores on days 7 and 14 decreased significantly compared with pretreatment scores in all groups; SF-36 scores on days 7 and 14 decreased significantly compared with pretreatment scores in the 21- and 23-gauge needle groups; and SF-36 score on day 14 showed significant difference between the 21- and 25-gauge needle groups. For pain intensity during injection, VAS scores indicated no significant difference between the 3 groups.



CONCLUSIONS: No difference between the needle types was observed in terms of VAS or NDI, or in terms of pain intensity felt by patients during injection. In terms of SF-36 scores, injections with 21- or 23-gauge needles were found to be more effective. However, a well-controlled investigation is needed to explore the effect of needle thickness on health-related quality of life.
MeSH terms
AdultAgedAnalgesics/administration & dosage*Analysis of VarianceEquipment DesignFemaleHumansInjections, Intramuscular/instrumentation*MaleMiddle AgedMyofascial Pain Syndromes/drug therapy*Neck MusclesNeck Pain/drug therapy*Needles*Pain MeasurementQuality of LifeQuestionnairesTreatment Outcome
DOI
10.1016/j.apmr.2009.01.028
PMID
19651267
Appears in Collections:
Journal Papers > School of Medicine / Graduate School of Medicine > Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
Journal Papers > School of Medicine / Graduate School of Medicine > Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine
AJOU Authors
윤, 승현나, 은우신, 승수
Full Text Link
Export
RIS (EndNote)
XLS (Excel)
XML

qrcode

해당 아이템을 이메일로 공유하기 원하시면 인증을 거치시기 바랍니다.

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Browse