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Relationship of serum antioxidant micronutrients and sociodemographic factors to cervical neoplasia: a case-control study.

Authors
Cho, H; Kim, MK; Lee, JK; Son, SK; Lee, KB; Lee, JM; Lee, JP; Hur, SY; Kim, JH
Citation
Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine, 47(8):1005-1012, 2009
Journal Title
Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine
ISSN
1434-66211437-4331
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although there have been some epidemiological studies on the effects of diet and nutritional status on cervical carcinogenesis, evidence for a protective effect of antioxidant micronutrients against cervical neoplasia is insufficient. The relationship between serum antioxidant micronutrients and sociodemographic factors and the risk of cervical neoplasia was investigated in this multi-center, case-control study. METHODS: The study population included women with histopathological diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1 (n=147), CIN 2/3 (n=177), cervical cancer (n=160), and a control group (n=378). Epidemiological data were collected and the serum concentrations of beta-carotene, lycopene, zeaxanthin plus lutein, retinol, alpha-tocopherol, and gamma-tocopherol were measured using reverse-phase, gradient high-pressure liquid chromatography. RESULTS: Cervical cancer was found to be associated with older age, increased body mass index, and lower socioeconomic status as measured by education level and income. The mean serum concentrations of beta-carotene, lycopene, zeaxanthin plus lutein, retinol, alpha-tocopherol, and gamma-tocopherol of cervical cancer patients were significantly lower than those of control subjects. Odds ratio adjusted for age, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and human papillomavirus infection status revealed a significant gradient of decreasing risk of CIN 1, CIN 2/3, and cervical cancer with increasing serum concentrations of most antioxidant micronutrients. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study show an inverse association between serum antioxidant micronutrient concentrations and the risk of cervical neoplasia. These results suggest that antioxidant micronutrients play a role in the prevention of cervical carcinogenesis.
MeSH terms
AdultAntioxidants/analysis*Case-Control StudiesFemaleHumansKorea/epidemiologyMicronutrients/blood*Middle AgedRisk FactorsSocioeconomic FactorsUterine Cervical Neoplasms/bloodUterine Cervical Neoplasms/epidemiology*
DOI
10.1515/CCLM.2009.221
PMID
19589102
Appears in Collections:
Journal Papers > School of Medicine / Graduate School of Medicine > Obstetrics & Gynecology
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