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Complementary and alternative medicine in the undergraduate medical curriculum: a survey of Korean medical schools

DC Field Value Language
dc.contributor.authorKim, do Y-
dc.contributor.authorPark, WB-
dc.contributor.authorKang, HC-
dc.contributor.authorKim, MJ-
dc.contributor.authorPark, KH-
dc.contributor.authorMin, BI-
dc.contributor.authorSuh, DJ-
dc.contributor.authorLee, HW-
dc.contributor.authorJung, SP-
dc.contributor.authorChun, M-
dc.contributor.authorLee, SN-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-02T03:43:42Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-02T03:43:42Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.issn1075-5535-
dc.identifier.urihttp://repository.ajou.ac.kr/handle/201003/8154-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The current status of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) education in Korean medical schools is still largely unknown, despite a growing need for a CAM component in medical education. The prevalence, scope, and diversity of CAM courses in Korean medical school education were evaluated.



DESIGN: Participants included academic or curriculum deans and faculty at each of the 41 Korean medical schools. A mail survey was conducted from 2007 to 2010. Replies were received from all 41 schools.



RESULTS: CAM was officially taught at 35 schools (85.4%), and 32 schools (91.4%) provided academic credit for CAM courses. The most common courses were introduction to CAM or integrative medicine (88.6%), traditional Korean medicine (57.1%), homeopathy and naturopathy (31.4%), and acupuncture (28.6%). Educational formats included lectures by professors and lectures and/or demonstrations by practitioners. The value order of core competencies was attitude (40/41), knowledge (32/41), and skill (6/41). Reasons for not initiating a CAM curriculum were a non-evidence-based approach in assessing the efficacy of CAM, insufficiently reliable reference resources, and insufficient time to educate students in CAM.



CONCLUSIONS: This survey reveals heterogeneity in the content, format, and requirements among CAM courses at Korean medical schools. Korean medical school students should be instructed in CAM with a more consistent educational approach to help patients who participate in or demand CAM.
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dc.language.isoen-
dc.subject.MESHAcupuncture Therapy-
dc.subject.MESHAttitude of Health Personnel-
dc.subject.MESHComplementary Therapies/*education-
dc.subject.MESH*Curriculum-
dc.subject.MESHData Collection-
dc.subject.MESHEducation, Medical, Undergraduate/*methods-
dc.subject.MESHHealth Services Needs and Demand-
dc.subject.MESHHomeopathy-
dc.subject.MESHHumans-
dc.subject.MESHIntegrative Medicine-
dc.subject.MESHMedicine, Korean Traditional-
dc.subject.MESHNaturopathy-
dc.subject.MESHProfessional Competence-
dc.subject.MESHRepublic of Korea-
dc.subject.MESH*Schools, Medical-
dc.subject.MESHTeaching/*methods-
dc.titleComplementary and alternative medicine in the undergraduate medical curriculum: a survey of Korean medical schools-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.pmid22849549-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthor전, 미선-
dc.type.localJournal Papers-
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/acm.2011.0179-
dc.citation.titleJournal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.)-
dc.citation.volume18-
dc.citation.number9-
dc.citation.date2012-
dc.citation.startPage870-
dc.citation.endPage874-
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.), 18(9):870-874, 2012-
dc.identifier.eissn1557-7708-
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Journal Papers > School of Medicine / Graduate School of Medicine > Radiation Oncology
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