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A higher burden of small low-density lipoprotein particles is associated with profound changes in the free androgen index in male adolescents.

Authors
Choi, YJ; Choi, SH; Kim, HJ; Han, SJ; Hwang, JS; Chung, YS; Lee, KW; Cho, HK; Kim, DJ
Citation
Journal of Korean medical science, 26(4):534-539, 2011
Journal Title
Journal of Korean medical science
ISSN
1011-89341598-6357
Abstract
From a young age, males are at higher cardiovascular risk than females. Dyslipidemia, including a higher burden related to small low-density lipoproteins (LDL), plays an important role in precipitating atherosclerosis in both males and females. We investigated sex differences in atherogenic lipoprotein burden and the independent predictors of LDL particle size in children and adolescents. We measured the concentrations of total testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, estradiol, total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL particle size in 135 children and adolescents (67 boys, 68 girls). The free androgen index was significantly and negatively correlated with LDL particle size (r = -0.273, P = 0.026) in boys, but estrogen and LDL particle size were not related. In a stepwise multiple regression analysis adjusted for body mass index, age, and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, free androgen index was still an independent predictor of LDL particle size in boys (R(2) = 0.075, P = 0.026). The prominent decrease in LDL particle size along with increased testosterone concentrations in males might explain why they are more likely to display atherogenic dyslipidemia from adolescence.
MeSH terms
AdolescentAge FactorsAtherosclerosis/bloodBody Mass IndexCholesterol, HDL/bloodCholesterol, LDL/bloodEstradiol/bloodFemaleHumansLipoproteins, LDL/*bloodMaleParticle SizePuberty/bloodRegression AnalysisRiskSex FactorsSex Hormone-Binding Globulin/analysisTestosterone/*bloodTriglycerides/blood
DOI
10.3346/jkms.2011.26.4.534
PMID
21468261
Appears in Collections:
Journal Papers > School of Medicine / Graduate School of Medicine > Endocrinology & Metabolism
Journal Papers > School of Medicine / Graduate School of Medicine > Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine
AJOU Authors
최, 용준김, 혜진한, 승진황, 진순정, 윤석이, 관우김, 대중
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